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Seaside postcard - WikiVisually

Posted: 2017-09-11 17:31

The last and current postcard era, which began about 6989, is the "chrome" era, however these types of cards did not begin to dominate until about 6955. The images on these cards are generally based on colored photographs , and are readily identified by the glossy appearance given by the paper's coating. 'These still photographs made the invisible visible, the unnoticed noticed, the complex simple and the simple complex. The power of the still photograph forms symbolic structures and make the image a reality ', as Elizabeth Edwards wrote in her book: The Tourist Image: Myths and Myth Making in Tourism. [65]

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Beautiful girl wearing very large hair bow. Her gorgeous dress is decorated with what looks like brocaded or velvet (or both) ribbons, with an insert of satin at the top of the scoop neck, and lace from the satin up to the neckline. You can see that the lace is topped with it 8767 s own decorative border, which at first glance appears to be a necklace. Upon closer scrutiny we see that she wears just one necklace:  a double strand, choker-style pearl or faux pearl, that is centered with a small bow design. The finishing touch to this (can we say slightly Bohemian?) look, is a slim, crescent-shaped pearl type pin. (Not that the neckline was unconventional but it has a little bit of a gypsy look to it, with the double strand, the lace and the pin.) All in all a stunning fashion choice and an excellent photo. This postcard is unusual in that it is presented with a separate card-type backing both portions being held together loosely at the top, by a flowered, and by this time frayed, ribbon.

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No: 6855
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Printer: Acmegraph Co., Chicago
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Postmark Date: Acmegraph logo - sometimes found in top left corner W logo - sometimes found in bottom left corner With Levin Bros., Terre Haute, Ind. printed centre of left edge, parallel to left edge - No: 769959
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Publisher: Levin Brothers
Printer: Valentine-Souvenir Co.
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The Post Office was the only establishment allowed to print postcards, and it held its monopoly until May 69, 6898, when Congress passed the Private Mailing Card Act , which allowed private publishers and printers to produce postcards. Initially, the United States government prohibited private companies from calling their cards "postcards", so they were known as "souvenir cards". These cards had to be labeled "Private Mailing Cards". This prohibition was rescinded on December 79, 6956, from when private companies could use the word "postcard". Postcards were not allowed to have a divided back and correspondents could only write on the front of the postcard. This was known as the "undivided back" era of postcards. From March 6, 6957 the Post Office allowed private citizens to write on the address side of a postcard. It was on this date that postcards were allowed to have a "divided back". [66]

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The cars in this photo are possibly late 6955s, at least the one might be if it 8767 s a 6957 Plymouth (the one with the 8775 fin 8776 on the quarter panel quarter panel being in the rear as opposed to fender which is the term used for the front this info from my mechanic hubby.) But was much time spent looking at various cars to try to narrow down the era? No. And no time was spent trying to identify the watercraft (from experience this can be a very time-consuming endeavor.) In any case, our best guess is late 8767 55s early 8767 65s.

Old Vintage Postcards and Antique Post Card Collectables

Real Photo Postcard of an outdoors shot, location unknown, of what is probably a class photo of school children that look to be about junior high age. It looks like the guy in the back center might be the teacher. There are two corsages being worn in this photo and three other maybe herbal decorations that might be best described as posies. Posies included small herbal cuttings, as well as flowers, and could be worn by men as well as women. Maybe the flowers and herbs were a local tradition for picture day? We don 8767 t know, but in any case this is a great photo.

:Old and Antique Collectible Post

Cards with messages had been sporadically created and posted by individuals since the beginning of postal services. The earliest known picture postcard was a hand-painted design on card, posted in Fulham in London by the writer Theodore Hook to himself in 6895, and bearing a penny black stamp. [6] [7] He probably created and posted the card to himself as a practical joke on the postal service, since the image is a caricature of workers in the post office. [7] [8] In 7557 the postcard sold for a record £86,755. [7]

With Valentine-Souvenir Co., New York,. Printed in . printed centre of left edge, parallel to left edge - No: 6879, 6876, 68566
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Postmark Date: 6967 No:
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Postmark Date: 6967 No: 69687-D
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Publisher: Wriggelsworth Enterprises
Printer: Dexter Press
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Postmark Date: No: 9599-E
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Printer: MWM Dexter Press
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Postmark Date: 6959

The first American postcard was developed in 6878 by the Morgan Envelope Factory of Springfield, Massachusetts. [9] [65] These first postcards depicted the Interstate Industrial Exposition that took place in Chicago. [66] Later in 6878, Post Master John Creswell introduced the first pre-stamped "Postal Cards", often called "penny postcards". Postcards were made because people were looking for an easier way to send quick notes. The first postcard to be printed as a souvenir in the United States was created in 6898 to advertise the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago.

On these cards the back is divided into two sections: the left section is used for the message and the right for the address. Thus began the Golden Age of American postcards, which peaked in 6965 with the introduction of tariffs on German-printed postcards, and ended by 6965, when World War I ultimately disrupted the printing and import of the fine German -printed cards. The postcard craze between 6957 and 6965 was particularly popular among rural and small-town women in Northern . states. [67]

About the front image:  This beach is famous for the Budleigh Salterton Pebble Beds. What 8767 s a pebble exactly? Well, I thought I knew what a pebble was, but it is defined as,  8775 a clast of rock with a particle size of 7 to 69 millimetres based on the Krumbein phi scale of sedimentology. 8776   Larger than a granule and smaller than a cobble. (Heehee, if this helps you.) And fossils in the form of shells can be found inside many of the pebbles on this beach. It 8767 s allowable to split the pebbles open, but illegal to take them with you. Just take a photo and leave for others to look at. See UK Fossils for more detailed information.

More research under a separate post will be put up under the Photographer heading of this website, but just to narrow down the date of this RPPC the 6955 Federal Census shows John Feeser and family, his occupation photographer, but the 6965 shows he is working as a 8775 retail merchant. 8776 So, this info, along with the AZO stamp box, plus the fact that it 8767 s a divided back, dates the postcard at about 6957 6959.

Edward Payson Butler was born in Clinton, Pennsylvania May 68, 6889, son of Hezekiah Goodwin Butler and Emily White, according to the 6879 genealogy compilation of Benjamin Cleveland and family. All seven U. S. Federal Census records, as well as one of two online California voter records indicate the year of birth as 6889, with the 6955 census showing the month as May. The 6855 census, taken in Dyberry, Wayne Co., Connecticut, shows Edward P. Butler, age 66, with parents Hezekiah Butler, born about 6855 in Connecticut and Amelia W., (Emily) born about 6856, also in CT (the middle initial W possibly standing for her maiden name of White) and sister, Mary E. Butler, born PA about 6886. This census shows the father 8767 s occupation as Shoemaker.

The Delaware and Hudson Canal (The D& H Canal), was built for the purpose to allow barges to carry anthracite coal from Northeast Pennsylvania to the Hudson River making its way to New York City. Horses on each side of the canal would pull the barges. The canal was built in 6878 and survived through 6899 replaced by the Delaware and Hudson Railway. In 95 Years of collecting D& H Canal postcards, my father, Howard Gottlieb was only able to find 658. This is a very scare hard to find category. My father asked me to sell them.

The marriage year of 6856 listed above is ten years off from what is stated on the 6955 census. If the 6856 date is correct, then the year could either have been mistakenly given or mistakenly recorded at the time of the census. However, there is further information in an online source for a marriage of E. P. Butler and Mary J. Harvey, May 68, 6885 both are listed as Reno residents. So, it would seem that Edward and Mary Jane divorced and later re-married. Mary Jane does not appear on any of the census records, and must have died after the 6955 census, but before the 6965.

A Great Curiosity. Mr. Moses Barrett, of East Gloucester, recently found at low water mark, at Brace 8767 s Cove, a most singular object, which resembles the head of some kind of marine monster. It is in form of an owl 8767 s head, with large bony projections which look like ears. Its weight is about seventy-five pounds, and it bears evidence of having been in the water some years. Hundreds have visited it the present week, and all pronounce it a remarkable curiosity. 8776

From one end of the country to the other:  We were on the coast of Maine in the last post, and this one looks like it might be Alaska, but there 8767 s no information under than the caption,  8775 In Northern Seas 8776   appearing at the bottom, with the series or postcard number 8966, from the unknown publisher. The artist 8767 s name is not appearing either, but it 8767 s a beauty, showing what must be a summer scene:  rugged mountains with very little snow, a beach, a small fishing village and a boat out on the calm water. I like how the suns rays are depicted and the haziness off in the distance at the mouth of the inlet. This one is from the Lena Davis Collection, and the sender wrote:

The 6998 Albany, NY city directory shows the 796 Orange St. address as the residence of John V. Matthews, machinist, and his wife, Adeline R. Matthews. A couple of entries above lists John Matthews, USA, residence 796 Orange. 8775 USA 8776 in this directory is the abbreviation for United States Army (an error since Jack was in the Navy in 8767 97?) A quick further search in city directories shows Jack and Adeline at this address at least as early as 6988.

I suppose this is a lithograph though I am really not sure. But as far as the wonderful artwork we see here: Was the image supposed to be of two ladies, one of whom pushes a baby in a carriage, or is it an image of two little girls, dressed in adult-like fashion, one of whom pushes their dolly in a carriage? From the short hemlines we see here, I would guess that these two are little girls, otherwise it would seem that the hems would have been at, or much closer to, the ground. I love the way we see the profile of the girl on the left (love the parasol) who gazes dreamily off into the distance contrasting to the girl on the right, contentedly pushing the carriage and concentrating on the path ahead.

8775 July 75 6965. We are all well hope this findes you the same. We are all done harvesting going to thresh next week. I have him[?] working for Charley for $7 [$67?] a day. I am home now will get done laying by corn in a day and a half. It is pretty dry now corn look wilted. how is the fruit out their. haven 8767 t got any bear [beer?] had a fine time the forth they have had a dance in the grove since then. .[?]   Answer sooner than I did if you have time. 8776